Targetting

targetting is generally done for 2 reasons:
– creating new rules and monitors
– overrides existing rules and monitors

For custom rules \ monitors I generally:
– create the rule \ monitor disabled
– create a group of objects that will be monitored
– set an overide enable against the group
– remember not to target the group directly (http://blogs.technet.com/brianwren/archive/2007/08/22/targeting-rules-and-monitors.aspx)

One tool that I find invaluable in assisting with this is the effective configuration viewer (This will tell you whether the rule \ monitor actually hit the agent …. which is always a good first step):
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=A9DB4DCA-6716-478D-89B9-42F27EBC76A8&displaylang=en

To get more involved with this you can use the Authoring Console to create classes and target more effectively that way …. it just depends how deeply you want to get involved in the authoring.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2008.11.targeting.aspx?pr=blog

For targeting overrides – when you go to set the override you will get a list of objects to target … even if I set this to a group I’ll make sure the group contains the objects that are listed as other options on the override.

Also check out the following:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/943239
http://download.microsoft.com/download/f/a/7/fa73e146-ab8a-4002-9311-bfe69a570d28/BestPractices_Rule_Monitor_REV_110607.pdf

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